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Nongame Bird Blog

Male Peregrine Falcon identified

I serendipitously caught the male in the nestbox Friday afternoon and snapped a series of screen shots. Fortunately, I was able to decipher the band combination,”19/K”. This is the same male present since 2003 and the only male Peregrine Falcon to sire offspring at the Capitol.   Thus, the same pair is back again for 2013. Difficult to read in this one photo, the green and black band reads “19/K” on the male Peregrine

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One Capitol Peregrine identified

I finally captured a screen shot good enough to confirm the band of the adult female Peregrine Falcon.   The band reads “A” on the upper portion and “Y” on the bottom portion, or in other words, “A/Y”.  Thus, this is Alley, the female from Winnipeg, Manitoba, present since 2005.  This is the only female that has successful bred at the Capitol.  Now, getting a look at the male’s bands may prove to be much more challenging.  We should also …

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Peregrine passion will take off quickly once spring arrives

Spring has been slow to emerge from the depths of winter this year.  Not surprisingly, the Capitol’s Peregrine Falcons have also been slow with their breeding activities this year compared to last.  On this date (26 March) last year, the first egg had already arrived.  With the forecast looking like it might finally be shaping up, expect activity around the nestbox to pick up quickly.  We still do not know for certain whether the same birds are back, so if …

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Capitol Peregrine progeny takes over in Omaha

Our friends over at the Woodmen (http://falcons.woodmen.org/) in Omaha announced this morning a mystery that was covertly solved late last week.   There is a new male Peregrine Falcon at the Woodmen this spring, supplanting the long-lived Zeus.  Surprise, surprise, the new male Peregrine in Omaha was hatched at the Capitol in 2010.   It has the band combination 57/H and was assigned the name “Mintaka” as a result of our “name-the-chicks” contest. It was just over a week I blogged …

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A Peregrine death in the family

We received a call on Friday of a dead Peregrine Falcon found on the roof of the First National Bank tower in Omaha.  The bird was banded with the auxiliary marker (the color band with the letter/number combination in a large font) 98/H.   This particular band combination is familiar; 98/H was banded at the Nebraska State Capitol on 2 June 2009.  The Peregrine was given the name “Niobrara” as a result that year’s name-the-chick contest. The dead Peregrine Falcon’s …

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Peregrine Falcons will be back in 2013!!

Some of the bugs and details are being worked out, but the Peregrine Falcon webcams will be up and running again this year. In fact, they are up and running right now.  All we need is some spring weather and a couple of birds.  The Peregrine Falcons are around, they apparently overwintered at the Capitol again this year. Thanks to Troy Kroeger for his work on this project and also thanks to our collaborators down at the Nebraska State Capitol …

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Eagles at Wanahoo appear to have eggs

Early March is a decisive time for Bald Eagles in Nebraska. If a pair is serious about nesting, they are at or have surpassed the egg-laying stage and have hunkered down for the month-plus-long incubation period. Sometimes, likely young pairs, may “play house” and build a nest but never follow through on actually nesting. Lake Wanahoo’s Bald Eagle nesting pair is established so it does not come as a surprise they appear to be on eggs. I visited the nest …

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Glaucous-winged Gull photo gallery

Finding rarities is just one of the great joys of birding.  A few photos are below of a near adult or adult Glaucous-winged Gull which Carlos Grandes and I found at Lake Ogallala on 16 February 2013.  Glaucous-winged  Gulls are a west coast species and, if accepted, this would be a fourth state record.  All photos are by Carlos Grandes.

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Salmonellosis suspected in eastern Nebraska – clean your bird feeders!

I received a report Monday morning of a few sick and dead Pine Siskins observed at up to three sites in eastern Nebraska.   Pine Siskins are small finches similar to American Goldfinches.   Siskins occur in flocks and will frequent bird feeders and this has been a particularly good winter for siskins in some parts of Nebraska.  Salmonellosis is a bacterial disease that is in the salmonella family and birds commonly contract the disease at bird feeders.  Pine Siskins tend …

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