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Nongame Bird Blog

Egg #3

As expected, the female Peregrine Falcon laid egg #3 midday Wednesday. A fourth egg, if there is to be one, should arrive during the day on Friday.   If you are looking for our our streaming video where you can watch the birds and their eggs live, please click HERE. Good birding!

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The Wilkinson Whooping Cranes

As announced in a press release last week, Wilkinson Wildlife Management Area in Platte County was partially closed to public access until late yesterday (5 April) due to the presence of three adult Whooping Cranes.  The birds were visible from a county road and nearly 400 people have come out to see them during their stay.  Monday evening, the birds put on quite a show and I was fortunate to capture some video of them dancing.  The video is below.  In addition to the …

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Egg #2

Either late Sunday or early Monday the female Peregrine Falcon laid egg #2. Egg #3 should appear in about two days.  If you are looking for our LIVE! streaming video where you can see every breaking moment at the Peregrine Falcon’s nest box, click HERE. Good birding!

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First egg!

I was out in the field today so I am late to the show.  As everyone knows, the Peregrine Falcons welcomed their first egg today! Expect to see egg #2 in about 2 days.   If you are looking for our streaming video, please click HERE. Good birding!

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Expect an egg anytime

It is time.  The Capitol’s Peregrine Falcons should be welcoming there first egg into the world anytime. Maybe by the time you read this, it will have happened already. The two previous years, the female Peregrine Falcon laid her first egg on 31 March.  Will she make it three years in a row?   She has also been increasingly hanging out in the nest box, often just sitting there (such as in the photo, below).  Such lethargy is expected when …

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Peregrine Falcons – same pair?

Spring is here and with it comes various avian rituals.   Sandhill Cranes on the central Platte River, Greater Prairie-Chickens booming on leks and the Capitol’s Peregrine Falcons courting, mating and preparing to welcome their first egg into the world.  As falcon fans start seeing more and more activity at the nest box on the 18th floor of the Capitol via NGPC’s falconcam, one obvious question is always asked,…is it the same pair of adult falcons?  For the past ten years, …

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Bald Eagle nest surveys

It is that time of year again when Lauren Dinan and I are out and about checking Bald Eagle nests to determine the number of active nests in the state.   We’ve grown accustomed to statewide Bald Eagle nest numbers increasing and breaking records each year.  In 2016, we tallied 118 active nests, breaking the previous record of 111 active nests set just a year earlier.  Remember, as late as 1990 there were no active Bald Eagle nests in the state. …

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Hats off to Larry Snyder

It is always positive when one of the good guys (or gals) gets some recognition.   A few days ago there was a nice article in the Scottsbluff Star Herald about Larry Snyder and how he got involved in bird conservation in Nebraska’s southwest panhandle.  Larry has worked for Bird Conservancy of the Rockies (formerly Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory) for more than a decade.  I’ve known and worked with Larry for about ten years.  Rather than me rehashing the article, …

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In praise of sewage lagoons

Birders go places to find and see birds.  It doesn’t really matter what or where the place is, as long as there is the potential to find and see good birds.   Most serious birders know sewage lagoons are good, and sometimes great, places to find birds.   In fact,  some sewage lagoons are nationally or even internationally famous in birding circles because they have a track record of producing rarities.  To non-birders, though, the idea of heading to a sewage …

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Up to his old tricks

Last year at about this time, we were shocked and surprised when the resident male Peregrine Falcon from the Capitol was photographed in the nest box at the Woodmen Building in Omaha.  The bird was identified by his alphanumeric band “19/K”, which is also what he goes by since he was not named.   Well, I recently received a few emails from Mary Anne Reid who stated ol’ 19/K was spotted up there again.   This morning, she forward a …

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