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Big Peregrine news – a new Nebraska nest!

So Nebraska only has two pairs of nesting Peregrine Falcons, correct?  Well, not anymore……

I was recently contacted by Laura King-Homan of the Omaha Public Power District (OPPD) who informed me that they have a pair of Peregrine Falcons nesting on their smokestack at their power plant located in north Omaha.  I was aware they had placed a nest box on a smokestack years ago and had recently observed at least one adult Peregrine Falcon in the area, but the news that birds were nesting and actually have young came as a big, albeit pleasant, surprise.  Below are a few photos Laura provided and additional details can be found on OPPD’s website (including a snazzy YouTube video).

Nest box located atop the OPPD power plant in north Omaha. Photo credit: Andrew Roger/Omaha Public Power District.
Nest box located atop the OPPD power plant in north Omaha (inside red box). Photo credit: Andrew Roger/Omaha Public Power District.
An adult Peregrine Falcon and at least one eyas. Photo credit: Andrew Roger/Omaha Public Power District.
An adult Peregrine Falcon and at least one eyas in the nest box. Photo credit: Andrew Roger/Omaha Public Power District.
This photo shows at least two and possibly three eyases in the nestbox.
This photo shows at least two and possibly three eyases in the nest box.  Photo credit:  Andrew Roger/Omaha Public Power District
In this photo, it clearly shows the adult has a red and black band. Who is this mystery Peregrine Falcon? Photo credit: Photo credit: Andrew Roger/Omaha Public Power District.
In this photo, it clearly shows one adult has a red and black band. Who is this mystery Peregrine Falcon and where did he/she come from?  With time, hopefully we will find out. Photo credit: Photo credit: Andrew Roger/Omaha Public Power District.

At least one of the adults is banded, but it is not clear whether its mate also has bling.  According to Laura, even though there is a walkway, the nest box is not easily accessible (if you’ve seen the smokestack at this location, you can understand why!).  OPPD has not been able to capture a photo good enough to read the bird’s band, but they are working on it.     For those Peregrine Falcon enthusiasts whose suggested names were not selected by either the Woodmen’s or our own naming contests, the good news is you have another shot with these birds.  Visit the OPPD’s website to submit your suggestion and partake in the excitement.

Anyway you slice it, this is big news for Peregrine Falcons and Peregrine Falcon enthusiasts in Nebraska.

Nongame Bird Blog

Many thanks to OPPD, Laura King-Homan, and Andrew Roger for sharing this information and for allowing use of their photos on this blog post.  Thanks to OPPD for supporting Peregrine Falcons in Nebraska.

About Joel Jorgensen

Joel Jorgensen is a Nebraska native and he has been interested in birds just about as long as he has been breathing. He has been NGPC’s Nongame Bird Program Manager for eight years and he works on a array of monitoring, research, regulatory and conservation issues. Nongame birds are the 400 or so species that are not hunted and include the Whooping Crane, Least Tern, Piping Plover, Bald Eagle, and Peregrine Falcon. When not working, he enjoys birding.

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