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State Record Summary, 2020

We had some state record fish caught last fall, so I realize that it has not been that long since I gave a state record update (State Record Updata, Fall 2020).  However, it is a new year, and I want so summarize the state record fish we had last year.  It was a busy year!

Surface Spearfishing

One record fish was taken by surface spearfishing in 2020.  It was a 10 pound 7 ounce silver carp taken from the Platte River in Hamilton County.

StateRecordSilverSurfaceSpearAug2020

Underwater Spearfishing

No state record fish were taken by underwater spearfishing in 2020.

Bowfishing

Bowfishing accounted for two state record fish last year.  The first was a 3 pound shorthead redhorse sucker taken from Lake Minatare.

StateRecordShortheadRedhorseBowfishJune2020a

The second was an 81 pound 14 ounce bighead carp taken from a private pit in Dodge County.

StateRecordBigheadArcheryJune2020c

Rod and Reel

Six state record fish were caught by rod and reel in 2020.  First, was a 15 pound 1 ounce silver carp from Duck Creek in Nemaha County.

StateRecordSilverCarpRodReelFeb2020b

Once June rolled around things picked up.  A 3 ounce flathead chub caught at Milburn Diversion Dam was the first rod and reel record ever entered for that species.

StateRecordFlatheadChubRodReelJune2020d

Just a few days later, an 89 pound flathead catfish was caught from the Missouri River in Nemaha County.

StateRecordFlatheadCatRodReelJune2020a

The next week the very notable catch was a 21 pound 9 ounce hybrid striped bass (i.e. wiper) caught at Lake McConaughy.

StateRecordWiperRodReelJune2020b

Then, as I stated earlier, the last two rod and reel state record fish were caught last fall.  A 1 pound 11 ounce green sunfish was caught from a Pawnee County pond.

StateRecordGreenSunfishRodReelOct2020

Lastly, the tiger trout rod and reel state record pushed another half pound heavier to 5 pounds 7 ounces.  That fish was caught from Sutherland Reservoir.

StateRecordTigerTroutRodReelNov2020a

That is the small and large of it.  A variety of state record fish were caught last year.

In my opinion, 2020 was a very good year.  Some very exceptional fish were caught that beat records that had been on the books for dozens of years.  The last four state records caught in 2020 were all caught on rod and reel and were very impressive sport fish!

There are more details behind all of the records listed here.  If you are interested in those, refer back to State Record Update, August 2020, and State Record Update, Fall 2020.

You can see a complete list of all state record fish here, Nebraska Record Fish.

Rules for having a fish certified as a state record can be seen in the 2021 Fishing Guide.  Although I will not share any here, I always have stories of fish that might have been new state records if only the angler had known.  Look the list and rules over, because any time you put a line in the water, you never know!  The next bite could be a state record!

To keep you wanting more, I will tease you with news that we have already had the first state record submitted for 2021.  Yes, it was a fish caught on rod and reel, pulled through a hole in the ice, and it will beat one of the records listed here!  I will wait for a few weeks to see if we have any more records come through the ice this winter.  Stay tuned, and GO FISH!

About daryl bauer

Daryl is a lifelong resident of Nebraska (except for a couple of years spent going to graduate school in South Dakota). He has been employed as a fisheries biologist for the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission for 25 years, and his current tour of duty is as the fisheries outreach program manager. Daryl loves to share his educational knowledge and is an avid multi-species angler. He holds more than 120 Nebraska Master Angler Awards for 14 different species and holds more than 30 In-Fisherman Master Angler Awards for eight different species. He loves to talk fishing and answer questions about fishing in Nebraska, be sure to check out his blog at outdoornebraska.org.

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