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Capitol’s Peregrine Falcon chick banded

As you may already know, the Peregrine Falcon eyas, who we now know is a male, was banded and given a check-up today by staff from the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission and Fontenelle Forest’s Raptor Recovery.  You may have already seen some video and photos on NGPC’s Twitter page.  Below are a few more photos from this morning’s event.

It was another pleasant morning at the nest box until the humans showed up. Here is the scene right before we grabbed the eyas out of the nest box.
It was another pleasant morning at the nest box until the humans showed up. Here is the scene right before we grabbed the eyas out of the nest box.
Here I am grabbing the eyas out of the nestbox. The adults were, understandably, upset and aggressive. Fortunately, I was afforded a little protection.
Here I am grabbing the eyas out of the nestbox. The adults were, understandably, upset and aggressive. Fortunately, I was afforded a little protection.  Yes, those things were made specifically for banding occasions and to keep the adults from harming the humans.
Got him! Here he is in our make-shift transport box.
Got him! Here he is in our make-shift transport box.
Lauren Dinan and I banded the eyas.
Lauren Dinan and I banded the eyas.
Betsy Finch, Janet Stander and Elaine Bachel of Fontenelle Forest's Raptor Recovery gave the bird a health check-up and took some blood for genetic work conducted by the Raptor Center at the University of Minnesota.
Betsy Finch, Janet Stander and Elaine Bachel of Fontenelle Forest’s Raptor Recovery gave the bird a health check-up and took some blood for genetic work conducted by the Raptor Center at the University of Minnesota.
All done. The entire process lasted less than 25 minutes.
All done. The entire process lasted less than 25 minutes.

We will be having a “Name-the-chick” contest and details will be coming soon.  All is well on the 18th Floor of the Capitol.

Many thanks to Betsy Finch, Janet Stander and Elaine Bachel of Fontenelle Forest’s Raptor Recovery, the Office of the Capitol Commission, Nebraska State Patrol, Brett Daugherty, Roxanne Smith, Melissa Panella and Dylan McCaugherty.  All photos by Melissa Panella.  

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About Joel Jorgensen

Joel Jorgensen is a Nebraska native and he has been interested in birds just about as long as he has been breathing. He has been NGPC’s Nongame Bird Program Manager for eight years and he works on a array of monitoring, research, regulatory and conservation issues. Nongame birds are the 400 or so species that are not hunted and include the Whooping Crane, Least Tern, Piping Plover, Bald Eagle, and Peregrine Falcon. When not working, he enjoys birding.

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