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Liberalized fishing regulations declared for Stagecoach Reservoir

LINCOLN, Neb. – Stagecoach Reservoir will be drawn down this fall for the construction of a new boat launch facility. In addition, the fishery will be renovated and a public salvage will be allowed.

A 10-foot drawn-down will allow for the construction of a new, lighted boat ramp, gravel kayak launch, and a new breakwater to protect the ramp and increase access for shoreline anglers.

Stagecoach’s fishery has been degraded by the presence of common carp and gizzard shad. The renovation will be followed by restocking of largemouth bass, bluegill, channel catfish, black crappie and walleye next spring.

From now until Nov. 22, 2017, anglers may salvage fish from Stagecoach for human consumption by any legal method, including snagging, hand fishing, spearing, legal baitfish seines, and landing nets. Use of electricity, explosives, poisons, chemicals, fish toxicants, firearms, and seines or nets not meeting legal specifications are prohibited. Length limits will be rescinded during this period but daily bag limits will be maintained.

In addition, due to concerns about the spread of aquatic invasive species and other unwanted species, salvaged fish cannot be sold or used for stocking into any other public or private water bodies. Anglers at Stagecoach must have appropriate fishing licenses and a park sticker.

As materials and equipment are moved onto Stagecoach State Recreation Area, roads to the boat ramp and dam area will be closed beginning Sept. 25.

The Sport Fish and Wildlife Restoration Fund provides funding for this project. Contact Jeff Jackson at 402-471-7647 for more information.

Stagecoach is located south of Hickman in Lancaster County.

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About Jerry Kane

Jerry Kane is the news manager with the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission. He can be contacted at jerry.kane@nebraska.gov or 402-471-5008.

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