Home » October Issue

October Issue

bird fight

Bird by Bird

To celebrate Nebraska’s sesquicentennial, the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission set out a challenge to the state’s birders: to spot as many species of birds as possible in 2017, with the goal of reaching 150. Some have taken it a step further: doing so through photographs.

Read More »
city foxes

City Foxes

A Facebook post leads to a mystery being solved. by Cara Pesek City Foxes Whether or not they’re distracted by a freshly killed chicken, foxes are more common in Lincoln and other cities than one might think, said Sam Wilson, the furbearer and carnivore program manager for the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission.  Foxes compete with larger canids, such as coyotes, for habitat and prey. Coyotes kill foxes when they have the chance, Wilson said. But coyotes are less likely …

Read More »
Hunting Big Grass

Hunting Big Grass

Upland bird hunting properties with public access, especially those with large expanses of seemingly uniform cover, can be intimidating. Where will you be when the season rolls around? Nebraska’s properties with public access may be found in the latest edition of the Public Access Atlas. Written by Justin Haag

Read More »
Venison Chili

Venison Chili with Queso, Fresco and Cilantro

A chili with south-of-the border influence. Lower in fat and every bit as tasty as traditional chili, there are as many versions of venison chili as there are beef.  My take on this classic, cold-season dish is stew-like. This venison chili is slow cooked with both ground and stew meat and also three different kinds of beans for a hearty, satisfying texture. Not-so-secret ingredients include a dash of brown sugar and molasses to create depth and balance out heat. Instead …

Read More »
Root coffee

Best Fall Wild Edibles: Roots

During the fall and into the winter months, some of the best edibles are available. After the edibles of summer are gone, the roots of several plants can be utilized. Dandelion Root Dandelions (Taraxacum) grow from a long taproot. A first-year plant will have a root similar to that of a parsnip, bearing a light color and its flesh almost uniform when cross sectioned. An older plant’s root surface, however, is rougher and darkens to a brown color. These roots …

Read More »