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Nongame Bird Blog

Kestrel hatching in progress

The American Kestrels here at the NGPC headquarters are busy welcoming fluffballs into the world on this hot and windy day.   Late this afternoon, two of the five eggs hatched.   The kestrels, which are small falcons, can be viewed HERE.  Click on the still shot and the LIVE! video feed should begin playing.   As I stated in an earlier post, Internet Explorer sometimes does not work.   I suggest using either Firefox or Chrome as your internet …

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Hatch Watch

As the days warm up everything seems to move faster, including time.  A little less than a month ago the Peregrine Falcons completed their clutch of five eggs.   We are now close to the time when eggs should begin hatching.  The average incubation period for Peregrine Falcons is approximately 33 days.  This is nature so there is variation.  Nevertheless, we could possibly see our first “fluffball” over the weekend, but perhaps more likely the bundles of joy will appear early …

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Gadwall hybrid

I blogged about hybrid ducks on a couple occasions during the past few months.  First there was a Mallard X Pintail hybrid near North Platte and then the Mallard X Gadwall hybrid at Lake Ogallala.    On Saturday, 3 May, I observed yet another  hybrid puddle duck at Hansen Waterfowl Production in Clay County.  Luckily, I got decent documentation of this bird.  Take a gander at the video. Gadwall is clearly one of the parent species and this drake appeared …

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Curlew courtship refresher

One of the pleasures of experiencing the outdoors is making observations and learning something about the world.  The great thing about birds, birding, and bird study is that there is no end to learning.  Occasionally observations from the past are lost in one’s mind to the point where they are essentially forgotten.  In other words, I am getting older and recently I had a refresher course in Long-billed Curlew courtship behavior. Over the past ten days I’ve been roaming the …

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Peregrine Falcons: History at the Capitol

Contributed by Lauren Dinan, Nongame Bird Biologist Each spring old and new Peregrine watchers have questions about the history of the falcons at the Nebraska Capitol.  As we wait for eggs to hatch, now is a good time to provide a “brief history of the Peregrine at the Nebraska Capitol“.   This is the 10th year in a row Peregrine Falcons have nested on the 18th floor of the Nebraska State Capitol building. The first Peregrine Falcoln was observed near …

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The (other) falcons have eggs, too

Yes, the Peregrine Falcons have five eggs.  While you are enjoying the Peregrine Falcons, remember there is another “falconcam”.  We also have a camera peering into an American Kestrel nestbox here at the NGPC headquarter’s building  (see the location on this old post).  The small falcons have also laid five eggs . Check out this LIVE! streaming video by clicking HERE.  Once there, click the still shot and the streaming video should start.  Internet Explorer does not work on this …

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Five is enough (almost too many)

It appears the Peregrines have been overcome by sanity and ceased egg production.   Five eggs is certainly enough and above normal.  Peregrine Falcons nesting at mid-latitudes average about 3.8 eggs per clutch.   If you happened to check the webcam during the weather on Sunday, you might have witnessed that five eggs was almost more than the birds could handle in the rain and wind.  For a while, a couple of the eggs got loose.  Fortunately, Jeanne Hibbert captured some screen …

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Egg #5

First, I have to apologize.  My post is delayed because I am on the road and in the field.   Yup, there are now a whopping five eggs. I think five is enough, but do these birds?   We’ll find out soon enough.  Streaming video is HERE.

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Egg #4

Even though we do not know when it was laid due to a brief outage, egg #4 did indeed arrive either late Monday or early Tuesday. That could be it as four eggs is about the average Peregrine Falcon clutch size.  We will know for sure in two or three days.  To see the LIVE! streaming video, click HERE.

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Egg #3

The female Peregrine Falcon laid egg #3 at approximately 8:00 a.m. this morning, approximately 62 hours after laying egg #2. The interval between eggs #1 and #2 was approximately 58 hours.  Intervals between later eggs tend to be a bit longer, but perhaps egg #4, if there is to be one, will arrive Monday evening.   Be sure to check in on the LIVE! video feed streaming from the 18th floor of the Capitol, go there now by clicking HERE.

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