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19/K is released

Monday, October 3rd, was a good day because the long time resident male Peregrine Falcon, 19/K, was released back at the Capitol by Fontenelle Forest’s Raptor Recovery (FFRR).  As you certainly remember, 19/K was found injured and on the ground in Lincoln way back on June 6th.  After he was rescued, FFRR quickly determined he suffered a dislocated elbow.  FFRR treated 19/K, but it took time for him to recover, gain strength and get in condition to be released.  19/K is obviously a fighter, but this episode is the latest reminder that FFRR has an invaluable role in our state.   Without FFRR, the options for 19/K would have been limited and it is reasonably likely there would not have been the wonderful release that we were part of this morning.  Below are a few photos from this morning.

img_1048Betsy Finch talks about 19/K ‘s ordeal over the last few months as she holds him so the small crowd that gathered for the release can get a up close view of the bird.  Photo by Lauren Dinan.

19/K, Betsy Finch and the Capitol looming in the background. I dig this photo! Photo courtesy of Jeff Kurrus, NEBRASKAland magazine.19/K, Betsy Finch and the Capitol looming in the background. I dig this photo! Photo courtesy of Jeff Kurrus, NEBRASKAland magazine.

img_105019/K up close. Photo by Lauren Dinan.

img_1057FFRR volunteer Elaine Bachel had the well-deserved honor and privilege of releasing 19/K from the 18th floor of the Capitol.  Photo by Lauren Dinan.

The release! Photo courtesy of Jeff Kurrus, NEBRASKAland magazine.The release! Photo courtesy of Jeff Kurrus, NEBRASKAland magazine.

img_106619/K once again flying over Lincoln.  Photo by Lauren Dinan.

Hopefully, 19/K provide us no further drama for a while.

Nongame Bird Program

Thanks again to FFRR for making today possible.  Also thanks to our partners at the Office of the Capitol Commission for their assistance and to everyone that came out for the release party. 

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About Joel Jorgensen

Joel Jorgensen is a Nebraska native and he has been interested in birds just about as long as he has been breathing. He has been NGPC’s Nongame Bird Program Manager for eight years and he works on a array of monitoring, research, regulatory and conservation issues. Nongame birds are the 400 or so species that are not hunted and include the Whooping Crane, Least Tern, Piping Plover, Bald Eagle, and Peregrine Falcon. When not working, he enjoys birding.

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